Chronic Pain Solutions for Complete Recovery Pt. 2: Movement

In Chronic Pain Solutions for Complete Recovery Part 1, we discussed “neuroplasticity”, the ability for the amazing brain to change and grow for the better.  For a quick review, check out this cool, short YouTube video  on neuroplasticity. Part 2 Movement will focus on how and why movement is crucial to help decrease chronic pain.

Motion is lotion.

The body and brain loves movement.  A sedentary lifestyle associated with fear of movement or lack of motivation to move leads to weakened muscles, stiff joints, weight gain, increased inflammatory cells, brain atrophy and… more pain. Movement grows new neuronal connections within the brain, basically rewiring the faulty circuitry associated with our internal pain alarm. Remember the burglar and alarm analogy from Part 1?

Use it or lose it

Above is an illustration of our brain. The region highlighted in rose color is the called the motor cortex, which basically  is a map of our body located on the brain, our virtual body. Each body part is represented on a specific region of our motor cortex. The tongue and hands have a lot of real estate on the brain compared to the knee because the tongue & hands are critical for survival.

For example, when you speak, the tongue section of the motor cortex is activated.  When you turn your head to look at an attractive person passing by, the neck and upper back  on your brain’s map light up like a Christmas tree.   However, if  you have chronic neck pain and can’t rotate your neck fully, your “virtual neck” doesn’t fire as quickly or intensely and can even atrophy.  The good news is that we can retrain our brain, restoring these lost connections which reduces pain because of the brain’s neuroplasticity.

No Brain, No Pain

OK, so we know that without a functioning brain, we cannot feel pain. With chronic lower back pain, patients have a smaller “virtual lower back” on their motor cortex as compared to healthy subjects.1, 2, 3. The good news is that no matter how long you have experienced chronic pain, with consistent practice of various techniques including daily movements we’ll discuss here, the brain can learn healthier patterns which results in 1) reactivation of the motor cortex and 2) less pain.

A study in 2010 looked at motor cortex activation of patients who had 4+ years of low back pain who either participated in a  walking program or a core exercise program4.  The group who participated in the deep core exercise program gained more lower back “real estate” on their motor cortex (ie showing more brain activation) and they reported a significant decrease in lower back pain.

The group who did the walking program showed no changes in pain nor brain activation. Walking can be very helpful for the joints, muscles and heart, but specific exercises targeting the area in pain can improve brain activation and lower pain.

Core Training

Below are three videos on training the deep core muscles (Transverse Abs, deep lower back). These videos are not to be used in lieu of seeing your medical doctor or physical therapist.

Level 1 Core Video

Level 2 Core Video

Level 3 Core Video

What about other areas of the body in pain? Generally speaking, there are actually core muscles for your neck which are the deep cervical flexors; the core muscles for your arms are the scapular muscles and the core stabilizers of your legs are glutes and pelvic floor.  Exercising these muscles can help change the brain to look and act similarly to those without pain.

Strength Training

When you think of strength training what do you visualize?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you picture the bulky weightlifter power-cleaning hundreds of pounds? While this is technically strength training, so is lifting 1 lb. dumbbells for 3 sets of 5 reps.  Your “heavy” is not your boyfriends “heavy”, is not your mom’s “heavy” and may not be your ‘heavy” 2 months from today.

Strength training streamlines the body and can create a more toned, slim appearance. It helps breakdown fat up to 72 hours after a workout, stabilizes your spine so your posture keeps in good alignment and nerves can function more easily. Strength training also prevents osteoporosis by building bone density, decreases visceral (abdominal) fat linked to heart disease, helps control appetite and decreases inflammation throughout the body5. Most importantly, it can help rewire the brain and eliminate pain just like core training does.

Here are three strengthening level 1 basics for anyone. Remember these are suggestions and if you are having pain, best to first consult with your physical therapist to get tailored advice.

Squats

Region targeted: thighs and glutes Frequency: 2-3x/week
Joints stabilized: hips and knees Intensity: heavy with minimal discomfort
Helps with: bending, lifting, sit to stand 2-3 sets 8-12 reps, 30s rest -> 3-4 sets 6-8 reps, 1-2’ rest

Bent Over Rows

 

 

 

 

 

 

Region targeted: back, shoulders, trunk, arms Frequency: 2-3x/week
Joints stabilized: shoulder, elbow, spine Intensity: heavy with minimal discomfort
Helps with: pulling, lifting, carrying 2-3 sets 8-12 reps, 30s rest -> 3-4 sets 6-8 reps, 1-2’ rest

Push Ups

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Region targeted: shoulder, chest, upper back Frequency: 2-3x/week
Joints stabilized: shoulder, elbow, spine Intensity: heavy with minimal discomfort
Helps with: pushing, carrying, lifting 2-3 sets 8-12 reps, 30s rest -> 3-4 sets 6-8 reps, 1-2’ rest

Daily Movement

Another great way to begin to counteract sedentary lifestyle, especially if you sit for work or school, is to track your steps via a pedometer or on your phone. Depending on your fitness level and pain levels, aim for 5000 steps every day and gradually increase to 8000 then 10,000 steps (over time). Research shows that doing high impact cardio workouts is too stressful for many people with chronic pain so walking can promote similar benefits6.

Even if you are house bound, taking a stroll around the house/apartment once an hour can start to add up your steps. Instead of going to the mall to shop, let it be a destination for a comfortable walk with plenty areas to rest anytime you need.  If you work, walk an extra few blocks to the subway/bus stop, or park your car farther away from your home.  Instead of taking an elevator to your exact floor, take it to the floor below.

Once walking becomes easier, begin a targeted core and strengthening program for all of the benefits listed above. There are so many! Move every day, avoid being too sedentary, get guidance to help you find your best exercise plan and most importantly keep practicing this for at least 3 months. You’ll be amazed to feel less pain by that time.

References

  1. Strutton PH, Theodorou S, Catley M, McGregor AH, Davey NJ. Corticospinal excitability in patients with chronic low back pain. Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques 2005;18(5):420e4.
  2. Tsao H, Galea MP, Hodges PW. Reorganization of the motor cortex is associated with postural control deficits in recurrent low back pain. Brain 2008;131(Pt 8):2161e71.
  3. Flor H, Braun C, Elbert T, Birbaumer N. Extensive reorganization of primary somatosensory cortex in chronic back pain patients. Neuroscience Letters 1997;224(1):5e8
  4. Tsao H, Galea MP, Hodges PW. Driving plasticity in the motor cortex in recurrent low back pain. European Journal of Pain, 2010; Feb 22
  5. Tatta J. Heal your pain now. Boston, MA: Da Capo Press; 2017.
  6. Kristen M. Beavers, Daniel P. Beavers, Sarah B. Martin, Anthony P. Marsh, Mary F. Lyles, Leon Lenchik, Sue A. Shapses, Barbara J. Nicklas; Change in Bone Mineral Density During Weight Loss with Resistance Versus Aerobic Exercise Training in Older Adults, The Journals of Gerontology: Series A, , glx048

Pooping 102

Here’s the second part of  Poop 101

What should my poop look like?

Have you ever heard the expression ‘you are what you eat’? Well, it’s true! What we put into our bodies affects the health of our gut, which has more neurons than is in our brains! Say what? So, it’s helpful to occasionally take a peek at the color, shape and size of your poop.

The chart above reflects this. Imagine if you’ve barely had any water all day, as you are busy rushing from place to place. Maybe you grabbed a sandwich or pizza for lunch. Your stool may end up looking like Type 1, separate hard lumps, difficult to pass because you are dehydrated. The stool is hard because the intestines have absorbed all of your fluid, leaving nothing behind but what looks like rabbit pellets.

If you’ve ever had a stomach virus, you may have had type 7 or diarrhea. Your body also may have trouble digesting certain types of foods such as products with lactose or artificial sweeteners. Generally, softer stools are associated with inflammation.

Normal, healthy stool is type 3 or 4, sausage shaped which is not too lumpy and stays together as one solid mass.

If your stool is not diarrhea, but comes out in soft blobs with clear-cut edges, you may be lacking fiber in your diet. Fiber can prevent and relieve both constipation and diarrhea. Insoluble fiber moves bulk through the intestines and balances the intestinal pH, whereas soluble fiber binds with fatty acids and slows transit time. The best form of fiber is from natural sources, such as fruits and vegetables.

How frequent should I go?

The frequency of a bowel movement (BM) varies frequently from once a day to every 3 days and that can be completely normal. Again, you do not need to poop every day to be normal and healthy. Remember, it takes up to 72 hours for the stool to pass through the large intestine alone. Everyone has their own version of normal. Now, what is abnormal?

Diarrhea is defined as loose stool more than 3 times per day. Constipation is defined as straining to pass stool or a feeling of incomplete emptying with a frequency of bowel movements less than 2 times per week.

As a general rule of thumb, the longer digestive contents are in the intestines, the harder the stool and greater chance of constipation. The opposite is true of diarrhea. In other words, if the intestines don’t have time to absorb fluid, the feces are more likely to be soft or liquid. Remember, the intestines absorb 1000 – 1500 mL of liquid leaving just 100- 150 mL for the stool. If the body doesn’t have time to absorb this liquid, diarrhea can occur.

What factors affect intestinal motility?

  • Amount of feces
  • Chemical makeup of feces
  • Intestinal hormones
  • Nervous input to intestines
  • Female hormones
  • Emotions
  • Visual and olfactory input
  • Time of eating, schedule
  • Systemic diseases – anorexia, diabetes myelitis, hypothyroidism
  • Activity level

What Can I Do To Poop Better?

 

You can improve bowel regularity through exercise;  find out the side effects of medications, especially beta-blockers and opioids; learn some easy ways to relieve your stress and eat regular meals.

Other helpful tips to stimulate a BM:

  • drinking warm water w/ lemon in the AM to stimulate the bowels
  • do an “ILU massage” or self-intestinal abdominal massage
  • taking a morning walk or do some yoga poses

An example of a self-intestinal massage is shown above. Provide light strokes in the direction in a clockwise direction as shown for 1-3 minutes or until you hear a “gurgling” of your stomach.

References

Doughty, D. (2002). “When Fiber is Not Enough: Current Thinking on Constipation Management.” Ostomy Wound Management 48(12):30-41

Force, A. (2005). “An Evidence-Based Approach to the Management of Chronic Constipation in North America.” American Journal of Gastroenterology 100(S1):S1-S22.

Hawkey, C.J., Bosch, J., Richter, J.E., Garcia-Tsao, G., &Chan, F.K. (Eds.). (2012). Textbook of clinical gastroenterology and hepatology. John Wiley & Sons.

 

POOPING 101 – Part 1

What is one thing we all have in common? What brings us all together? We all poop!  How much do you know about your bowel movements? What does it mean when your stool is a different color, shape, texture? What leads to constipation or diarrhea? How can we have a healthy bowel movement and how often should we have a bowel movement?

 

I am writing this blog in two parts to help you have a better understanding of the mysterious #2, because pooping is an integral part of our daily life and can tell us a lot about our health.

DIGESTION

Lets start from the beginning, how food travels from entry to exit:

1. ORAL CAVITY & ESOPHAGUS Digestion begins in the mouth, as saliva helps break down starches. The esophagus is the portal to which the contents travel to our stomach. No digestion occurs here, but “heart burn” can occur when there is backflow from the stomach up into the esophagus through the cardiac orifice seen above.

2. STOMACH Now that the food has made it to the stomach, acids break down proteins. Food spends approximately 2-4 hours here before traveling to the small intestine through the pyloric sphincter

3. SMALL INTESTINE  In the small intestine, over the course of 4-6 hours, our body continues to break down starches and proteins and tackle a new molecular compound called carbohydrates. Juices secreted from the pancreas and liver help break down starches, fats and proteins.

4. LARGE INTESTINE What’s next? You guessed it, the large intestine, which absorbs 1000- 1500 mL per day, leaving 100-150 mL along as hardened feces to the rectum. Digestive contents spend the longest time here, approximately 24-72 hours. It travels through the ileocecal valve up the right side of the abdomen through the ascending colon, across the transverse colon and down the left side into the descending colon.

5. RECTUM Using strong peristaltic waves, our bodies push stool into the rectum. That’s when we have our first urge to defecate. We have stretch receptors which tell our bodies to relax an involuntary muscle called the internal anal sphincter while we close our external anal sphincter (EAS) to keep feces from coming out until we are ready.When we sit on the toilet, our EAS relaxes along with our puborectalis muscle. This relaxation combined with a gentle increase in intra-abdominal pressure pushes fecal matter out. Placing our knees higher than our hips, via a squatty potty or stool, helps relax the puborectalis muscle even more, allowing from easier elimination as shown below. The external anal sphincter (EAS) changes its tone based on what it senses. If it senses liquid, such as diarrhea, the EAS increases its tone. If it senses, gas, it allows that to be selectively released. If it senses solid stool, our body can override our urge to defecate until we are at a toilet, so we can hold it in when necessary.

When we sit on the toilet, our EAS relaxes along with our puborectalis muscle which surrounds the rectum tightly at rest creating the “anorectal angle”. When the puborectalis relaxes it allows the rectum to have easier passage. This combined with a gentle increase in intra-abdominal pressure pushes fecal matter out. Placing our knees higher than our hips, via a squatty potty or stool, helps relax the puborectalis muscle even more, allowing  easier elimination.

GOOD DEFECATION TECHNIQUE

A healthy bowel movement (BM) should not involve straining or pushing. The action of defecation is a part of the parasympathetic nervous system, which helps the body soften and relax. The first step to a good BM is making sure you are in a comfortable, safe place. Have you ever noticed it’s easier “to go” at home versus in an unfamiliar place?

If we lose our ability to properly relax with a bowel movement we may start to strain with defecation, which over time is injurious to our body.

Here are some quick, easy tips for a healthy BM.

  • Sit with your knees above your hips, feet resting on  a child’s step stool or “Squatty Potty”
  • Place both hands on your abdomen, or, if you have jaw tension, support your head in your hands
  • Draw up or contract your pelvic floor muscles as though you are trying to hold back gas
  • Relax your pelvic floor muscles as though you are trying to release gas
  • Note how the stomach muscles relax and bulge forward
  • Relax the pelvic floor muscles and think of widening the rectal opening
  • Imagining your body is a tube of toothpaste, pushing from the top down, brace and breathe out
  • You can use certain sounds such as “grrr” and “shhh” to help gently increase intra-abdominal pressure to pass stool

If you feel like you are unable to perform an easy BM even with taking fiber, drinking water, or are spending too much time in the bathroom, straining often, or experience frequent constipation and bloating, consult a pelvic floor physical therapist.  We’ll assess if restricted pelvic floor, abdominal muscles are hindering your function. We perform gentle manual therapies to restricted muscles/fascia of both internal and external pelvic areas, visceral mobilization  to help the organs move optimally and “do their thing”,  use biofeedback to retrain the pelvic floor muscles so they don’t contract when they are supposed to relax, teach breathing techniques and other home exercises.

Stay Tuned for “Pooping 101 – Part 2”!

 

 

 

Multi-Disciplinary Approach is best for relieving Chronic Pelvic Pain

Evelyn and her DPT staff traveled to Chicago for the International Pelvic Pain Society conference to learn about the evolving sciences and evidence based treatment for pelvic pain.

Pelvic pain is typically located in the lower part of your abdomen & pelvis and can stem from the reproductive, urinary or musculoskeletal systems. The cause of pelvic pain can be complicated, involving interactions between gastro-intestinal, genito-urinary, musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine systems and can include socio-cultural factors.

So it’s important to have a medical team working with you. Your team can include a urologist, pelvic physical therapist, gynecologist, gastroenterologist, psychologist, radiologist acupuncturist and sex therapist.

In our experience we find that patients just need 2-3 team members such as a medical doctor well versed in pelvic pain to guide on medications and general health, an experienced pelvic physical therapist who provides education, manual and movement therapy, and a talk therapist to address underlying emotional traumas. 

UPOINT  helps MD’s find best treatments for Male pelvic pain

Most men with symptoms of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), such as penile pain or discomfort, urinary urgency/frequency, inability to sit, testicular pain and/or ED, have been given a diagnosis of “Non Bacterial Prostatitis” and prescribed antibiotics. I often hear from my patients that the medicine didn’t help, as their prostate gland was not infected, which is what antibiotics target. Many men were not getting pain/symptom relief from antibiotics and doctors needed a better system to determine the cause of CPPS.  UPOINT was developed to help.

 

UPOINT is a classification system to determine the specific diagnosis and treatment for male CPPS. The white boxes below represent the cause of symptoms, which in the case of CPPS, can be multiple. The higher the number of causes, the more severe the symptoms.  The gray boxes show the appropriate treatment options depending on the cause(s).1

 

 

A study of 100 men assessed and treated with the UPOINT system saw an 84% reduction in pain and disability. 2 CPPS can have multiple classifications including Psychosocial, Neurologic/Systemic and Tenderness of Skeletal Muscles.  These men healed with a combination of pelvic floor physical therapy, medication that targets nerves and talk therapy. By using the UPOINT system doctors can prevent the natural increased anxiety and pain escalation that these patients experience the longer they experience pain.  

Women with Endometriosis benefit by a team of providers

The BC Women’s Centre for Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to treat women with endometriosis which resulted in 45% of their patients feeling “much better” in regards to pain and quality of life. Twenty three percent (23%) reported feeing “somewhat better” and only 20% reported feeling the “same”. These results were seen at the completion and at the 1 year follow up of the program.3

 

What does this interdisciplinary approach look like?

BC’s approach included education in the recent science of pain – how the brain is involved in sending pain signals as a form of protecting the body and how the brain can be retrained to lower or stop sending those signals. BC clients received pelvic physical therapy which involved manual therapy to release adhesions of muscles, fascia & intestines and movement/exercise prescription. They were also assessed by a gynecologist, received counseling (stress management), nursing care management and  BC’s team would meet to discuss their patients to ensure great outcome.

Create Your Medical Team

Women may not have access to nor can afford an extensive program like BC’s, however they can use the same approach with their own care. An experienced pelvic physical therapist can be the liaison between the medical doctor and all other healthcare providers as we tend to spend dedicated 45 minutes to an hour of interrupted time with our patients.  Being open to explore other treatment options such as cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture and nutritional guidance as this can also lower symptoms of endometriosis.

 

 

Pelvic Physical Therapy helps Cervical Cancer Survivors

 After being diagnosed and successfully completing cervical cancer treatment, we learned that 66% of cervical cancer survivors suffer from urinary issues such as leaking. Thirty three (33)% percent have a “storage dysfunction” which means the bladder sends the “Gotta Go” signal when it is only a quarter or half full, making women go to the bathroom too many times a day. Fifty (50) % have voiding dysfunction, which means there is left over urine in the bladder or the time it takes to pee is markedly increased.4

Pelvic physical therapy is an accepted treatment option for these women. Gentle manual release of the lower abdominal, inner thigh and pelvic floor/perineal regions and pelvic floor muscle training using biofeedback can significantly improve urinary incontinence, sexual function and quality of life for women who survived cervical cancer. Progressive use of vaginal dilators can help promote optimal healing of vaginal tissues after radiation.5

We want all women to feel good and confident about their body after cancer treatments and are thrilled to see this research.

  1. Nickel JC. C. Paul Perry Memorial Lecture “Clinical Approach to Male CPPS”. 2016.
  2. Shoskes DA, Nickel JC, Kattan MW. Phenotypically directed multimodal therapy for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a prospective study using UPOINT. J Urol. 2010;75(6).
  3. Allaire C. Innovations in the Evaluation and Care of Women with Endometriosis. 2016.
  4. Katepratoom C, Manchana T, Amornwichet N. Lower urinary tract dysfunction and quality of life in cervical cancer survivors after concurrent chemoradiation versus radical hysterectomy. Int Urogyn J. 2014;5(1).
  5. Lyons M. Women, Cancer and Pelvic Pain. 2016.

 

 

 

EMH Physical Therapy Goes To Chicago for The International Pelvic Pain Society (IPPS) Conference on Chronic Pelvic Pain

                                     

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screen-shot-2016-10-07-at-11-40-39-amAt EMH Physical Therapy, we support an interdisciplinary approach to treating our patients. We are in constant communication with primary care physicians, urologists, psychologists, gynecologists and other healthcare providers to make sure all our patients have a strong team working for them

A team based approach to medical care has been shown to prevent medical errors (1), improve patient-centered outcomes and chronic disease management (2-4). 

This week the EMH team are packing our bags and headed to Chicago to attend the International Pain Societys annual fall meeting on chronic pelvic pain where well hear practitioners of various disciplines discuss advances and techniques in treating pelvic pain. Some topics were excited about exploring include the mind-body” connection, psychosocial aspects of pelvic pain, cancer and pelvic pain, cystitis, hormone treatments, vulvodynia and more. 

The International Pelvic Pain Society (IPPS) was established in 1996 with the goals of educating health professionals on how to diagnose and manage chronic pelvic pain and to bring hope to men and women who suffer from this pain by raising public awareness (5). 

Their website, pelvicpain.org, contains articles which can help to educate patients on a wide variety of conditions and find healthcare providersWe are excited to share the information we learn at IPPS conference with all of you when we return to New York City next week! Stay tuned.

P.S. Well be active on Instagram, @emhpysicaltherapy, and Twitter, @EMHPH, while were away, so keep up with us there!

Resources:

1. IOM (Institute of Medicine) To err is human. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1999.

2. Bodenheimer T, Wagner EH, Grumbach K. Improving primary care for patients with chronic illness: The chronic care model, part 2. Journal of the American Medical Association.2002;288(15):19091914.

3. Ponte P, Conlin G, Conway J, et al. Making patient-centered care come alive: Achieving full integration of the patients perspective. Journal of Nursing Administration. 2003;33(2):8290.

4. Wagner EH, Austin BT, Davis C, Hindmarsh M, Schaefer J, Bonomi A. Improving chronic illness care: Translating evidence into action. Health Affairs. 2001;20(6):6478.

5. International Pelvic Pain Society. Pelvicpain.org

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“Cupping”: not just for Olympians

image1

Were you watching the Olympics this summer wondering about those red circles on Michael Phelps’ shoulders? Those marks, called “sha,” are from an ancient Chinese healing technique known as “cupping.

Cupping has been around for over 5,000 years. It’s practitioners stated it released toxins and helped correct imbalances in the flow of energy.

There were two cupping types: dry and wet. Dry cupping is performed when a glass bulb with a smooth rounded lip is suctioned onto the skin via heat. Either a cotton ball is lit on fire and used to generate heat inside the cup, or alcohol is rubbed around the rim and lit on fire before being placed on the skin.

The heat inside the bulb generates a vacuum like effect, producing a negative pressure on the connective tissue or fascia under the skin pulling the skin upwards (1).

The resulting  “sha” are painless broken skin blood vessels which heal in 3-7 days.

Wet cupping was administered in the same way, except the skin is slit prior to application to allow blood to escape (2).

This method is rarely used today.

Myofascial Decompression – cupping in the 21st century

image2

The modern application of cupping by physical therapists is known as “myofascial decompression.”

The purpose of myofascial decompression is to:
  • reduce adhesions, scar tissue of skin and connective tissues
  • restore normal mobility
  • improve efficiency of movement.

Instead of glass bulbs, hard plastic cups are used and instead of heat generating a vacuum, a hand pump suctions the skin. This allows for a more precise application of pressure.

The application of cupping is done with the “cup” device left in place for 5 – 10 minutes or slowly moved back and forth over the restricted area.

How can we – non super-human species – benefit?

While more studies are needed the literature thus far shows some positive effects from myofascial decompression (3), including decreased neck (4) and low back pain (5).

Empirically, we at EMH Physical Therapy observe that the cupping technique combined with functional movements reduces pain and releases tight tissues quicker for patients with painful cesarean scars, plantar fasciitis, scoliosis and other conditions.

Keep in mind that cupping is an adjunct treatment, used alongside other types of manual therapy, therapeutic exercise and neuromuscular re-education at the discretion of your physical therapist.

References

1. Kravetz, R.E., 2004. Cupping glass. The American Journal of Gastroenterology 99, 1418.
2. Xue, C.C., O’Brien, K.A., 2003. Modalities of Chinese medicine. In: Leung, P.-C., Xue, C.C., Cheng, Y.-C. (Eds.), A Comprehensive Guide to Chinese Medicine. World Scientific, Singapore, pp. 19–46.
3. Cao H, Han M, Li X, Dong S, Shang Y, Wang Q, et al. Clinical research evidence of cupping therapy in China: a systematic literature review. BMC Complementary & Alternative Medicine 2010;10:70.
4. R. Lauche, H. Cramer, K. -E. Choi et al., “The influence of a series of five dry cupping treatments on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain—a randomised controlled pilot study,” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 11, article 63, 2011.
5. Y. D. Kwon and H. J. Cho, “Systematic review of cupping including bloodletting therapy for musculoskeletal diseases in Korea,” Korean Journal of Oriental Physiology & Pathology, vol. 21, pp. 789–793, 2007.

 

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