Multi-Disciplinary Approach is best for relieving Chronic Pelvic Pain

Evelyn and her DPT staff traveled to Chicago for the International Pelvic Pain Society conference to learn about the evolving sciences and evidence based treatment for pelvic pain.

Pelvic pain is typically located in the lower part of your abdomen & pelvis and can stem from the reproductive, urinary or musculoskeletal systems. The cause of pelvic pain can be complicated, involving interactions between gastro-intestinal, genito-urinary, musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine systems and can include socio-cultural factors.

So it’s important to have a medical team working with you. Your team can include a urologist, pelvic physical therapist, gynecologist, gastroenterologist, psychologist, radiologist acupuncturist and sex therapist.

In our experience we find that patients just need 2-3 team members such as a medical doctor well versed in pelvic pain to guide on medications and general health, an experienced pelvic physical therapist who provides education, manual and movement therapy, and a talk therapist to address underlying emotional traumas. 

UPOINT  helps MD’s find best treatments for Male pelvic pain

Most men with symptoms of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), such as penile pain or discomfort, urinary urgency/frequency, inability to sit, testicular pain and/or ED, have been given a diagnosis of “Non Bacterial Prostatitis” and prescribed antibiotics. I often hear from my patients that the medicine didn’t help, as their prostate gland was not infected, which is what antibiotics target. Many men were not getting pain/symptom relief from antibiotics and doctors needed a better system to determine the cause of CPPS.  UPOINT was developed to help.

 

UPOINT is a classification system to determine the specific diagnosis and treatment for male CPPS. The white boxes below represent the cause of symptoms, which in the case of CPPS, can be multiple. The higher the number of causes, the more severe the symptoms.  The gray boxes show the appropriate treatment options depending on the cause(s).1

 

 

A study of 100 men assessed and treated with the UPOINT system saw an 84% reduction in pain and disability. 2 CPPS can have multiple classifications including Psychosocial, Neurologic/Systemic and Tenderness of Skeletal Muscles.  These men healed with a combination of pelvic floor physical therapy, medication that targets nerves and talk therapy. By using the UPOINT system doctors can prevent the natural increased anxiety and pain escalation that these patients experience the longer they experience pain.  

Women with Endometriosis benefit by a team of providers

The BC Women’s Centre for Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to treat women with endometriosis which resulted in 45% of their patients feeling “much better” in regards to pain and quality of life. Twenty three percent (23%) reported feeing “somewhat better” and only 20% reported feeling the “same”. These results were seen at the completion and at the 1 year follow up of the program.3

 

What does this interdisciplinary approach look like?

BC’s approach included education in the recent science of pain – how the brain is involved in sending pain signals as a form of protecting the body and how the brain can be retrained to lower or stop sending those signals. BC clients received pelvic physical therapy which involved manual therapy to release adhesions of muscles, fascia & intestines and movement/exercise prescription. They were also assessed by a gynecologist, received counseling (stress management), nursing care management and  BC’s team would meet to discuss their patients to ensure great outcome.

Create Your Medical Team

Women may not have access to nor can afford an extensive program like BC’s, however they can use the same approach with their own care. An experienced pelvic physical therapist can be the liaison between the medical doctor and all other healthcare providers as we tend to spend dedicated 45 minutes to an hour of interrupted time with our patients.  Being open to explore other treatment options such as cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture and nutritional guidance as this can also lower symptoms of endometriosis.

 

 

Pelvic Physical Therapy helps Cervical Cancer Survivors

 After being diagnosed and successfully completing cervical cancer treatment, we learned that 66% of cervical cancer survivors suffer from urinary issues such as leaking. Thirty three (33)% percent have a “storage dysfunction” which means the bladder sends the “Gotta Go” signal when it is only a quarter or half full, making women go to the bathroom too many times a day. Fifty (50) % have voiding dysfunction, which means there is left over urine in the bladder or the time it takes to pee is markedly increased.4

Pelvic physical therapy is an accepted treatment option for these women. Gentle manual release of the lower abdominal, inner thigh and pelvic floor/perineal regions and pelvic floor muscle training using biofeedback can significantly improve urinary incontinence, sexual function and quality of life for women who survived cervical cancer. Progressive use of vaginal dilators can help promote optimal healing of vaginal tissues after radiation.5

We want all women to feel good and confident about their body after cancer treatments and are thrilled to see this research.

  1. Nickel JC. C. Paul Perry Memorial Lecture “Clinical Approach to Male CPPS”. 2016.
  2. Shoskes DA, Nickel JC, Kattan MW. Phenotypically directed multimodal therapy for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a prospective study using UPOINT. J Urol. 2010;75(6).
  3. Allaire C. Innovations in the Evaluation and Care of Women with Endometriosis. 2016.
  4. Katepratoom C, Manchana T, Amornwichet N. Lower urinary tract dysfunction and quality of life in cervical cancer survivors after concurrent chemoradiation versus radical hysterectomy. Int Urogyn J. 2014;5(1).
  5. Lyons M. Women, Cancer and Pelvic Pain. 2016.

 

 

 

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