A Pregnant Physical Therapist’s Top Tips for Your Healthy Pregnancy

Navigating the pregnancy literature on proper posture, exercise and sleeping alignment can be overwhelming and the guidelines presented are often not a “one size fits all”. Afterall, everyone’s pregnancy is unique. Below you will find some quick and easy tips that I utilized and found helpful throughout my pregnancy that kept me fit, aligned and pain free throughout my work day as a physical therapist at EMH.

Save

Save

Save

Having trouble losing the “Mom Belly” Post Baby?

Why diastasis recti may be your problem and how you may be making it worse…

checkyoself

 

If you’re doing a million crunches to get your abs back post baby but can’t seem to lose that last little “pooch,” STOP!! You may be experiencing a very common postpartum complaint: diastasis recti.

 

What is diastasis recti?
It’s a separation of your rectus abdominis (6-pack muscles). As your belly expands during pregnancy, the connective tissue between the right and left sides of the muscle (called the linea alba) stretches to accommodate your growing baby. This separation may persist postpartum and in some women does not naturally reduce. This gap leaves your abdominals less functional, weaker and allows the other soft tissues to hang out. This causes that little belly that most new moms learn to hate.

Do I have diastasis recti?
Lay on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Place 2 fingers at your belly button. Now lift your head like you’re trying to look at your belly while keeping your abs relaxed. Do you feel a gap along the midline of your abs at your belly botton, how about above or below the belly button? If you can fit more than 2 fingers in this “gap” you have a moderate-severe case of diastasis recti.test

What can I do about it?
Don’t freak out! You can learn a simple exercise to “brace” your abdominals that will begin to close this gap. Begin on your back with knees bent, feet flat and try to engage your deep abdominals by inhaling and bringing the navel to the spine as you exhale. See the exercise program below (“Other Resources” at the bottom of this blog) for a beginner plan geared towards closing the gap of your diastasis recti. If your goal is to get back to running, yoga, barre classes, spin classes etc., it’s recommended that you attend a few (anywhere from 2-12) PT sessions in order to strengthen your abdominals and avoid stressors that you’re not ready for. For example, planks and crunches are too challenging for abdominals weakened by diastasis recti and can worsen the separation if done improperly or too soon.

Bracing Steps (standing & lying down)

abdominal_brace_blog

bracing1

 

 

Other Resources:

image1

Home exercise program for beginners: View at www.my-exercise-code.com using code: TGQQAGV

http://mumafit.com.au/  A site created by an aussie mom of 3, Maternal Wellbeing Specialist, and International Holistic Life and Wellness Coach. She also has a very popular app that has quick and easy exercise programs for during and after pregnancy.

Save

Strong Abs during Pregnancy and for New Mom’s

The staff Doctors of Physical Therapy at EMH specialize in pre and postpartum physical therapy for a healthy pregnancy and a fast recovery after delivery. Preventing Diastasis Recti is one aspect of our expertise.
Please forward to all your pregnant/new mom friends and family!

Diastasis Recti Abdominis (DRA) can occur in up to 66% of pregnant women due to hormones that allow ligaments and joints to relax, the increasing baby size in utero, improper weight lifting (ie heavy food bags, other children, furniture etc), a history of prior C-section or abdominal surgery and repetitive poor mechanics during daily activities and lack of regular exercise.

Men can also develop DRA due to faulty weight lifting mechanics, obesity and chronic medical conditions that result in frequent coughing such as bronchitis.

What is a DRA?

DRA is defined as the separation and thinning of the rectus abdominus muscles (see diagram in green) and stretching of the linea alba (see diagram in blue). The linea alba runs from the xiphoid process (base of sternum) to the symphysis pubis (center of pelvic bone). Both the rectus abdominus muscle and linea alba are the main support for the front of the abdomen, keeping the visceral organs in place and functioning well. They also maintain pelvis stability during walking, lifting, bending and squatting.

What are the symptoms of DRA?

Symptoms may include:

  • Noticeable small or large bulge in the center abdomen
  • Sharp or burning abdominal pain during bending, lifting, standing and walking
  • Lower back pain
  • Feeling like the intestines or stomach may fall out
  • Poor posture
  • Longer term problems of prolonged DRA may include Stress Urinary Incontinence, Fecal Incontinence and Pelvic Organ Prolapse.

How To Measure for a DRA?

The best way to measure is a finger width measurement. Lie on your back, knees bent, head resting on floor/pillow. Place tips of 4 fingers across the body at naval or just above/below the naval per your comfort. Now raise your head and shoulders slightly upward. If your fingers descend inbetween the parallel rectus abdominus muscles on either side of your naval, measure how many fingers move downward. If there is a true split of the linea alba, your finger will fall into a space that feels squishy (your intestines live here!). A positive DRA is one where there more than 2 fingertips (1 inch or 2.5cm width) that lower. We have measured women with 3 to 4 inches ( 8cm) wide and have helped them narrow back to 1 inch (2.5cm) wide.

 

What to Do if you have a DRA?

Best to first consult a pelvic physical therapist for a tailored postural, stabilization and home exercise program targeting the Tranversus Abdominus (deepest and lowest muscle of our abdomen), the pelvic floor muscles and the multifidi muscles (lower back stabilizers). Here are some tips to help you immediately:

  • Avoid positions that may further separate the recti muscles, like doing sit ups, crunches, strong stretches of the abdomen, quick trunk rotation movements
  • Stand and sit symmetrically (not to weight bear more on one side vs the other)
  • During standing, gently unlock your knees and gently pull your stomach inward while breathing normally
  • Self bracing of your stomach with your hands pushing the rectus together when sneezing, coughing or laughing
  • Wear a pelvic and abdominal support product to help maintain erect trunk posture and decrease pain until your muscles are aligned and strong

 

 

Pelvic Pain App developed by Evelyn Hecht, PT

evelyn-and-joe-300x178

 

 

“She inspires us to not accept the status quo, to strive for wonderful things and not just acceptable things. There’s a lot of good nuggets of wisdom and interesting ways of looking at the profession. Some Apps are fun but the best are more about life”-  Dr Joe Simon

 

I felt this quote was the best to describe my thoughts about this interview. Dr Evelyn Hecht has been treating patients with Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PFD) longer than there has been a doctorate program at my alma mater. But innovation is not the key to riches. Evelyn saw a need in the marketplace and decided unlike many in our industry not to wait for someone else to do it .

Lately i have consulted with more and more physicians and surgeons on their legacy or exit strategy. Evelyn is no where near the end , matter of fact , she is on the cusp of a new road in healthcare. Apps are a highway of free traffic from possible clients from around the world. Evelyn has just made it easier for the vast population to accept her as the expert in the field.

Pelvic floor therapy is a growth factor for practices across the country. This new specialization is growing with a medical network from physicians, physios & psychologists.

INTRODUCING, PELVIC TRACK a new app to help PATIENTS and practitioners to work together. The challenges associated with communication with the therapist dealing with pelvic floor therapy. Again , it was not looking for a better mousetrap but to create one that doesn’t exist from the need of her patients and her therapists.

The motivation for our new grad and younger (not age but career wise)  listeners. Evelyn has made strides and conquered the niche market. Marketing pelvic floor therapy through facebook, through her blog and now through her App is something i would ask all my listeners to take a deeper look at.

I hope you find the takeaways that I did.

For more info or to read the article directly click  HERE

To purchase or for more info on Pelvic Track App click HERE

Pregnancy achieved following manual pelvic physical therapy for Mechanical Infertility

unnamed

Sumer Samhoury, MSPT

Manual Physical Therapy can help some women with Mechanical Infertility achieve  pregnancy.   To understand what Mechanical Infertility is and how manual pelvic physical therapy helps, let’s first review the steps to becoming pregnant.

Mechanics of pregnancy

To achieve pregnancy, the process of ovulation and fertilization within healthy, mobile, and supported reproductive organs (ovaries, fallopian tube and uterus) without presence of adhesions & scar tissue has to occur. The steps to pregnancy are

 

  • The woman’s body releases an egg from one of her ovaries (ovulation)
  • The egg is grasped by the “fingers” of the fimbria, located at the ends of the fallopian tubes.
  • The egg travels through the open, non blocked fallopian tube toward the uterus (womb)
  • The man’s sperm joins with the egg (fertilization)
  • The fertilized egg attaches to the inside of the uterus (implantation)

Mechanical Infertility

Mechanical Infertility (MI) is defined as the inability to become pregnant due to intra pelvic and abdominal adhesions on/around or within the reproductive organs. MI affects approximately 2.5 million ( 40%) of the 6 million infertile women in the United States who have not conceived after 1 year of unprotected sexual intercourse.

Adhesions around the ovary can prevent the release of the egg (ovum) from the ovary. Adhesions can squeeze the fallopian tube (s)like a used tube of toothpaste, so the egg cannot travel to the uterus to hook up with the sperm.    Adhesions can pull the uterus out of a centered, midline position which makes implantation of the fertilized egg difficult. Adhesions within the uterus could increase uterine spasms which can result in miscarriage.

What are Adhesions?

An adhesion is a sheet or band of scar tissue that binds two parts of tissue or organs together.   Normally, with no scar tissue present, organs are slippery and they glide against each other. Adhesions can look like thin sheets similar to  plastic food wrap or they can be thick fibrous bands,  like ropes.  These bands of scar tissue can wrap around your internal reproductive organs squeezing them too tight or pull the organs out of their normal centered alignment which prevents their  optimal  function during pregnancy.

Cause of Adhesions

Adhesions naturally develop when the body’s healing/repair mechanisms respond to any tissue disturbance, such as surgery, infection, trauma, or radiation.  Our body naturally cleans a damaged area, which is followed up by the laying down of collagen fibers to replace the damaged tissue.  The replaced new collagen is haphazard, fibers get bunched up  and cross-links form. As healing time continues, cross links may grow into microadhesions, then adhesions and may eventually thicken into scars  When a woman has pelvic or abdominal surgery,  such as a C-section or other gynecological surgeries,  the only visible scar is on the outside where the incisions may have been made, but  tissue also heals on the inside,  resulting in internal scarring.

The formation of internal pelvic adhesions is known to accompany any inflammatory process, whether it be internal trauma and bleeding (ruptured ovarian cysts or ruptured appendix), Endometriosis, or sexually transmitted infections such as Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).  Pelvic spasms, bowel obstructions and chronic abdominal/pelvic pain can also lead to adhesions.

The most common cause of adhesions within the uterus is due to previous uterine surgeries such as D&Cs either for abortions, miscarriages, or excessive bleeding. In addition, adhesions may be related to child birth when there are uterine infections or bleeding associated from childbirth, or if a Cesarean Section is performed.

What is Manual Pelvic Physical Therapy?

Manual pelvic physical therapy is a gentle hands on approach, no surgery, no drugs, to improve motion, decrease restriction and improve organ function. Manual therapy techniques for Mechanical Infertility can include:

  1. Myofascial Release to decrease restricted muscles and fascia (the web-like covering that surrounds all organs, muscles and nerves of the body)
  2. Visceral Mobilization to improve organ mobility and function
  3. Pelvic lymphatic drainage to reduce pelvic congestion

Myofascial Release is a safe and effective hands-on technique that applies gentle sustaining pressure to the restricted connective tissue to eliminate pain and restore motion. The slow sustained, gentle pressure allows fascia to elongate.

Visceral mobilization technique is a gentle hands on technique to release tight ligaments and connective tissue which surrounds and supports the internal organs. Just as a therapist would mobilize the shoulder for someone who has lost motion  tight  ligaments that support the organs also need to be treated.

The lymphatic system helps our body detoxify, drain stagnant fluids, regenerate tissues, filter out toxins and maintains a healthy immune system. Pelvic lymph drainage helps to re-circulate body fluids, stimulates the immune system and promotes relaxation and balance in the autonomic nervous system.

Pregnancy Achieved

In 2012, Doctor Mary Ellen Kramp, DPT published her infertility case study in the Journal of American Osteopathic Association demonstrating that 6 out of 10 women diagnosed with mechanical infertility conceived and delivered their healthy babies at full term following  manual pelvic physical therapy. These women were found to have mechanical infertility due to lymphatic congestion, sacral dysfunction and restrictions in uterine mobility and were treated with a group of manual therapies Dr Kramp described as above and  termed  “The Infertility Protocol”.

At EMH Physical Therapy, we received training to treat Mechanical Infertility and can offer this service to women to  help them achieve pregnancy.

 

Diastasis Recti Abdominis (DRA) or “Split Seams” can be treated by Pelvic Physical Therapy

Diastasis Recti Abdominis (DRA) can occur in up to 66% of pregnant women due to hormones that allow ligaments and joints to relax, the increasing baby size in utero, improper weight lifting (ie heavy food bags, other children, furniture etc), a history of prior C-section or  abdominal surgery and repetitive poor mechanics during daily activities and lack of regular exercise.

Men can also develop DRA due to faulty weight lifting mechanics, obesity and chronic medical conditions that result in frequent coughing such as bronchitis.

What is a DRA?

DRA is defined as the separation and thinning of the rectus abdominus muscles (see diagram in green) and stretching of the linea alba (see diagram in blue).  The linea alba runs from the xiphoid process (base of sternum)  to the symphysis pubis (center of pelvic bone).  Both the rectus abdominus muscle and linea alba are the main support for the front of the abdomen, keeping the visceral organs in place and functioning well.  They are also maintain pelvis stability during walking, lifting, bending and squatting.

What are the symptoms of DRA?

Symptoms may include:

Noticeable small or large bulge in the center abdomen

Sharp or burning abdominal pain during bending, lifting, standing and walking

Lower back pain

Feeling like the intestines or stomach may fall out

Poor posture

Longer term problems of prolonged DRA may include Stress Urinary Incontinence, Fecal Incontinence and Pelvic Organ Prolapse.

 

How To Measure for a DRA?

The best way to measure is a finger width measurement.  Lie on your back, knees bent,head resting on floor/pillow. Place tips of 4 fingers across the body at naval or just above/below the naval per your comfort.  Now raise your head and shoulders slightly upward. If your fingers descend inbetween the  parallel rectus abdominus muscles on either side of your naval, measure how many fingers move downward.  If there is a true split of the linea alba, your finger will fall into a space that feels squishy (your intestines live here!).  A positive DRA is one where there more than 2 fingertips (1 inch or 2.5cm width)  that lower.  We have measured women with 3 to 4 inches ( 8cm) wide and have helped them narrow back to 2.5cm width

 

What to Do if you have a DRA?

Best to first consult a pelvic physical therapist for a tailored postural, stabilization and home exercise program targeting the Tranversus Abdominus (deepest and lowest muscle of our abdomen), the pelvic floor muscles and the multifidi muscles (lower back stabilizers).

Here are some tips that you can do immediately:

Avoid positions that may further separate the recti muscles, like doing sit ups, crunches and quick trunk rotation movements.  Avoid being on “all fours”  or on hands and knees for too long during exercise classes.  Assuming the yoga, “cow position” where your belly drops down as your head and hips arch upwards,  puts too much pressure on the already stretched linea alba.  Plus, the yoga position of  “Up dog” and extensive backward bends are not recommended.

Stand and sit symmetrically in good posture  (don’t stand on one leg or sit with crossed legs leaning on one hip for too long)

When you are standing, gently unlock your knees and pull  your stomach inward while breathing normally to give abdominal  support and prevent “hanging out” on your ligaments

When you sneeze, cough or laugh you you can self bracing of your stomach with your hands pushing each side of the rectus abdominal muscles towards the midline, or hold a pillow against your stomach for bracing

Wear a pelvic and/or  abdominal support product to help support the growing baby in uteruo , maintain erect trunk posture and decrease pain until your muscles are stronger by doing core exercises.

By keeping your core toned during pregnancy and taking the steps to prevent further widening of your recti muscles, you can prevent extensive DRA.

 

 

Pelvic physical therapy is an effective non invasive treatment for Pelvic Organ Prolapse vs “high risk” transvaginal mesh surgery

The FDA recently deemed use of transvaginal mesh surgery to be “high risk” to repair pelvic organ prolapse.  See news link below:

http://www.philly.com/philly/health/womenshealth/HealthDay687309_20140429_FDA_Moves_Female_Incontinence_Device_to__High_Risk__Status.html

Pelvic physical therapy is a more effective and non invasive option.

In a 2014 study of 800 women with pelvic floor dysfunction (which includes pelvic organ prolapse) by University of Missouri, researchers found that ” incontinence, constipation, and/or pain improve by 80% with pelvic physical therapy”. Research shows that pelvic physical therapy plus a prescribed home exercise program works better than just engaging in one option.

Pelvic physical therapy teaches patients with pelvic organ prolapse how to build up the “floor” or muscular base of the pelvis. The pelvic floor muscles provide the main support for all pelvic organs. Kegels alone are not the only treatment option. If there is tension in the pelvic floor muscles, they need to to be released via manual therapies or risk further dysfunction. Sitting posture and good voiding habits are addressed, exercises are prescribed and body awareness improved.

EMH Physical Therapy has been providing successful pelvic physical therapy for 18 years in NYC. We have helped thousands of women return to better function. Call us today to get your prescription for pelvic health.

Evelyn Hecht PT receives award for 20 years as member of HSS Rehab Network

Evelyn-Hecht individual-HSS-Annual-Meeting

Evelyn Hecht, PT receives an award from Hospital for Special Surgery on February 25, 2014.

Her company, EMH Physical Therapy was recognized for 20 years of excellence as a Charter Member of the HSS Rehabilitation Network

Women’s Pelvic Health

Women's Pelvic Health

 

 

Check out this link ( link) to see Evelyn’s interview on physical therapy for women’s pelvic health in the Los Angeles Times. The app, Pelvic Track, is now available on the Apple store.

 

 

Pelvic Health Physical Therapy app Launches November 2013

Watch for the launch of my new app: “Pelvic Health PT, The Hecht Program“. Launch Date: November 2013!!

Pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) affects women (6 out of 10) and men (#’s unknown) and includes painful intercourse (women), painful or lack of erection (men),  constipation, incontinence after prostatectomy surgery (men), leaking of urine and/or feces with laughing, exercise or with the urge to go.  PFD can cause abdominal  bloating, urinary urgency,  straining during bowel movements,  pain in the pelvic/groin, lower back and hips.

The app, Pelvic Health PT, The Hecht Program” is a tool that I designed along with Kalpesh Wireless, a software company, to help men and women suffering from PFD, some too embarrassed to talk to their doctor about it, take action. By following some of my tips, techniques and exercises, you can regain a healthy pelvic floor.  This app is best used while working with a licensed physical therapist who specializes in pelvic floor rehabilitation.

When your physicians have run medical tests and all are negative for infection or inflammation and medication does not help, the most likely cause of your symptoms could be due to muscle and fascial restrictions, trigger points, weakness and incoordination of the internal and external muscle of the pelvis. The pelvic nerves  become pinched as they travel from your sacrum through the gluteal, hip and pelvic muscles to innervate the pelvic floor region leading to further dysfunction and pain.

For over 17 years, my practice has healed thousands of men and women with PFD by lengthening  restrictions, mobilizing the skin, muscle and nerves, teaching a tailored stretching and strengthening and postural home program.

The Pelvic Health PT, The Hecht Program  has over 50 exercises and awareness techniques to regain a healthy pelvis and pelvic function. Improved sexual function, decreased pain, improved bowel and bladder habits, and a stronger core are the results.

The  app has 4 parts: 1) Symptom Tracker 2)  Set Reminder, 3) Pelvic Relaxation & Stretching, 4) Pelvic Floor and Core Strengthening.

1) Symptom Tracker: Before starting some of my exercises and awareness techniques, go to the “My Symptoms” page and input each one of your symptoms /dysfunction. Be as detailed and descriptive as you want. Then for each symptom/dysfunction, rate the level of pain or discomfort on scale of 0 to 10, 0 = no pain or no trouble and 10 = worst pain or the most difficult.  After you input this detailed information, start to incorporate some of the awareness techniques and exercises that your pelvic floor physical therapist recommends.  If you do not have a pelvic floor physical therapist and working independently under the care of your physician, start slowly with the gentle tips/exercises incorporating one or two new things at a time. No exercise should increase your pain or symptom for more than 3 days following the exercise.  If this happens, stop the exercise and consult with a pelvic floor physical therapist.  If all is progressing well, at the 2 week or 1 month from starting Pelvic Health  PT, The Hecht Program, go to “My Symptoms” page and rate your symptoms at that point.  After 2 months, you should see some functional progress.   The symptom tracking helps you see that your body CAN change and motivates you to continue doing what you have started.

2) Set Reminder: You can program a reminder in your I-phone for an exercise or awareness technique that needs to be done many times a day. For example, a quick way to lower stress is to perform the Diaphragmatic Meditative Breath.  Program your reminder in the app for this exercise every 2 hours. You can become more calm during the day and prevent the build up of muscle tension, shallow breath and decreased oxygenation.

3) Pelvic Floor Relaxation and Stretching: Most people with PFD need to do the awareness techniques and pelvic floor relaxation BEFORE they start to do the strengthening, or, “Lengthen before Strengthen”  Anyone with pain should also do the relaxation exercises, assess their postures during the day (via photograph), adjust poor postures and do not start any strengthening exercises when first starting my program. Contracting or shortening an already tight muscle/fascial group will  cause further tension and result in increased pain.  Your pelvic floor physical therapist will guide you to become aware of your pelvic muscles, teach you how to relax and  lengthen all the muscles that attach onto the pelvis (hamstrings, inner thighs, hip flexors, plus more) before doing any strengthening.

4) Pelvic Floor and Core Strengthening: Once the muscles are stretched, the trigger points released and you are doing regular daily stretches, a gentle core strengthening program can begin. The app gives a progression from basic pelvic floor and abdominal recruitment, to full planks for maximum core stabilization training.  To insure long lasting results of pelvic floor rehabilitation, the core must be strengthened.

The app is best used while under the care of a licensed physical therapist who specializes in pelvic floor rehabilitation.   Your  physical therapist can direct you on which specific exercise to perform, teach you how to do the movements, perform manual therapies to reduce tension and trigger points and guide you on when to start a strengthening program.